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I love words. I'm learning to use them.

Tag: writing

Book Blog Tour for Charades

It has been a whirlwind since the release of Charades, and an awesome one at that! I think the most exciting part of this journey is to hear people’s responses to the story, so it has been fun to talk with my readers after they finish the book. Read the rest of this entry »

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Back Of The Book

Layer by layer, closer and closer to the June release.

The Unveil…

Coming soon to an Amazon bookstore near you (i.e., everywhere).

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The sweetness of doing nothing

Confession 1: I love check lists.

I use them every day at work and constantly update them according to how the day has progressed. As the end of my shift approaches, I rewrite the list for the next day and arrange my priorities so as to accomplish the most important task first. When I get home (on days when my wife works an evening shift and I’m home alone with my toddler), I’ll create a detailed list of things to get done before my wife gets home. Then, when I’ve completed them all, I’ll retreat to the couch and fire up Netflix. Read the rest of this entry »

Found, lost, rediscovered: A tale of four memoirs

“Memoir” (n): A collection of memories that an individual writes about moments or events, both public or private that took place in the author’s life.

I am discussing three books here. I’ll explain the title later.

Also, this is not a review, as I don’t feel that it’s possible (or fair) to review someone’s experience. It’s their truth, whether or not it’s agreeable, and it’s a sacred privilege to hear another person’s truth. Read the rest of this entry »

On dreams, healing and anticipation of a perfectly ordinary 2015

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I started this blog with big dreams and high hopes. My words would garner followers who would grow interested in what I had to say. My novel would then be received with eager anticipation. My dreams of entering the publishing world would be realized.

Want to know the crazy thing? It actually happened. Kind of. Read the rest of this entry »

How yoga impacts storytelling.

I am a passionate advocate for yoga. Not just for the physical benefits, but also for how it promotes mental and emotional wellness. I practice it because I have a very busy mind that constantly looks back and looks forward; this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but when it gains too much momentum, it becomes exhausting.

Yoga helps calm my ever-busy mind, reels me back from dwelling on the past and makes future worries seem a just bit more off in the distance. I can take inventory of what’s around me, express gratitude and refocus my perspective. And when I’m there in that present moment, I can listenYoga 2

Read the rest of this entry »

The first impulse comes from emotion.

“I think the first impulse comes from some deep emotion. It may be anger, it may be some sort of excitement. I recognize in the real world around me something that triggers such an emotion, and then the emotion seems to cast up pictures in my mind that lead me towards a story.”

~John Hershey

 

2013: A year of immersion.

I could sum up 2013 in a number of ways: Switched careers; travelled the Pacific coast; published my second book; learned I was going to become a father [!].

Another way would be this: I read. I read a lot. Read the rest of this entry »

Book review: Push

Push: A Novel

Brutal, ugly, horrific. Eloquent, beautiful, inspiring. Those are the conflicting emotions conjured up while reading this novel. Sapphire’s thoughtful and innovative prose brings Precious Jones – an illiterate 16-year-old with two children from her father – to life, draws you into her tragic world and carries you through her journey of making her life her own for the first time.

Here’s the premise: “Relentless, remorseless, and inspirational, this “horrific, hope-filled story” (Newsday) is certain to haunt a generation of readers. Precious Jones, 16 years old and pregnant by her father with her second child, meets a determined and highly radical teacher who takes her on a journey of transformation and redemption.”

Similar to Hubert Selby Jr.’s Requiem for a Dream, Push ignores conventional grammar and spelling rules so as to give the reader a first-hand account of Harlem life through the eyes of Precious. This approach is extremely effective, and I highly recommend this novel. The story is grim and real, but incredibly hopeful. Certainly not for the faint-hearted, but a powerful testimony to the life-changing power of language.