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Tag: review

Book review: Push

Push: A Novel

Brutal, ugly, horrific. Eloquent, beautiful, inspiring. Those are the conflicting emotions conjured up while reading this novel. Sapphire’s thoughtful and innovative prose brings Precious Jones – an illiterate 16-year-old with two children from her father – to life, draws you into her tragic world and carries you through her journey of making her life her own for the first time.

Here’s the premise: “Relentless, remorseless, and inspirational, this “horrific, hope-filled story” (Newsday) is certain to haunt a generation of readers. Precious Jones, 16 years old and pregnant by her father with her second child, meets a determined and highly radical teacher who takes her on a journey of transformation and redemption.”

Similar to Hubert Selby Jr.’s Requiem for a Dream, Push ignores conventional grammar and spelling rules so as to give the reader a first-hand account of Harlem life through the eyes of Precious. This approach is extremely effective, and I highly recommend this novel. The story is grim and real, but incredibly hopeful. Certainly not for the faint-hearted, but a powerful testimony to the life-changing power of language.

Book review: 101 Secrets for Your Twenties

101 Secrets For Your Twenties

I’m normally not a fan of non-fiction, self-help books. Yes, they can contain helpful information, but I prefer getting lost in the world of fiction. However, when I do happen to stumble across a book that resonates with me, I know it’s special for one of two reasons: 1) I’m encountering something I wish I had read about 10 years ago, or 2) I feel like I could be great friends with the author.

101 Secrets for Your Twenties, the debut book from author/speaker Paul Angone, fits both bills. Read the rest of this entry »

Book review: We Need to Talk About Kevin

 

We Need to Talk About Kevin by Shriver, Lionel. (Harper Perennial,2006) [Paperback]

I’m a man. I don’t have kids. I have no personal connection to school shootings. Nonetheless, We Need to Talk About Kevin felt incredibly real, and it hit home.

Here’s the synopsis of Lionel Shriver’s novel: Read the rest of this entry »

Feedback is humbling and rewarding.

It’s humbling and rewarding to hear people interact with the story, characters and themes contained within Eastbound Sailing. Here’s what Lisa Taylor had to say:

“I received [Eastbound Sailing] in the post yesterday, but was unable to begin reading until my lunch hour today. Eight chapters in, I left the book in the car so as not to get caught reading at my desk. In the 2 hours since arriving home I have completed it. Not because it is frothy, cotton candy fiction, but because i was ensnared by the first page. Chapter after chapter beckoned me to come in further. Until tears stung in my eyes and pain stabbed at my heart. Read the rest of this entry »