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I love words. I'm learning to use them.

Tag: books

Book Blog Tour for Charades

It has been a whirlwind since the release of Charades, and an awesome one at that! I think the most exciting part of this journey is to hear people’s responses to the story, so it has been fun to talk with my readers after they finish the book. Read the rest of this entry »

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Found, lost, rediscovered: A tale of four memoirs

“Memoir” (n): A collection of memories that an individual writes about moments or events, both public or private that took place in the author’s life.

I am discussing three books here. I’ll explain the title later.

Also, this is not a review, as I don’t feel that it’s possible (or fair) to review someone’s experience. It’s their truth, whether or not it’s agreeable, and it’s a sacred privilege to hear another person’s truth. Read the rest of this entry »

2013: A year of immersion.

I could sum up 2013 in a number of ways: Switched careers; travelled the Pacific coast; published my second book; learned I was going to become a father [!].

Another way would be this: I read. I read a lot. Read the rest of this entry »

Study: Reading literature makes us better thinkers.

I stumbled across a fascinating study today, claiming that reading literature helps encourage creativity and “sophisticated thinking” due to fostering a growing comfortableness with ambiguity. Here’s the heart of the findings:

“Are you uncomfortable with ambiguity? It’s a common condition, but a highly problematic one. The compulsion to quell that unease can inspire snap judgments, rigid thinking, and bad decision-making.

Fortunately, new research suggests a simple anecdote for this affliction: Read more literary fiction. Read the rest of this entry »

Editors can be your best friend.

A year ago, I wrote a post called “Everyone needs an editor – including me” which (to my delight) sparked some great conversation about the process of refining the storytelling process. Today, I stumbled across this short, simple video clip which, although it refers to film, does a great job explaining the symbiotic relationship between editors and content.

Perhaps more than anything, it drives home the point that writing and telling stories is not a one-person process. And that’s what I love about editing: working together to see the larger vision, identifying (and removing or revising) any content that takes away from that vision and refining the content into a beautiful story. I count it a great privilege to play a role in this process.

 

Shameless self-promotion: I love editing. Hit me up? 🙂

What does reading do for you?

I have been tearing through different books this year and am always blown away by lessons/insights I glean from each story, no matter the genre or subject matter.  I know I’m not alone in these experiences.

Yesterday, I stumbled upon an article that beautifully articulated these very feelings. Here’s a snap shot:

“Reading can create an intangible sanctuary where all are invited, regardless of faith, to receive benedictions that send us back into our respective broken worlds with more courage, strength, and hope.”

What about you? What does reading do for you?

Be a sublime fool.

To sum it all up, if you want to write, if you want to create, you must be the most sublime fool that God ever turned out and sent rambling.

You must write every single day of your life.

You must read dreadful dumb books and glorious books, and let them wrestle in beautiful fights inside your head, vulgar one moment, brilliant the next. Read the rest of this entry »

Storytelling inspiration from the big screen.

I’m both excited and terrified to announce that I’m breaking ground for my next novel. While I had the story in my head for more than a year, I had yet to actually begin any work. What does that mean? It’s time to hit the story board. Read the rest of this entry »

The world needs stories.

I love stories. Always have, always will. Whether it’s discovering a story or telling one myself, I don’t think a day has passed where I haven’t encountered a snapshot of someone else’s narrative.

Stories can be born from friendly conversation, personal testimony or faith systems. Whatever the source, stories make us human. I fully concur with author Philip Pullman: “After nourishment, shelter and companionship, stories are the thing we need most in the world.” Read the rest of this entry »

Shameless plug: Buy my book?

Book

“Read more books.” Was that part of your New Year’s resolution? Maybe I can help *Sneaky Grinch smile*

I don’t often do blatant pushes for my book, but I wanted to let you know that you can now get the e-version of Eastbound Sailing for just $2.55 via Diesel eBook Store.

Skeptical? Here’s what people are saying on Amazon: Read the rest of this entry »